willkommen-in-germany: Das Goethe-Institut in Prague, Czech…

willkommen-in-germany:

Das Goethe-Institut in Prague, Czech Republic. The Goethe-Institut is a non-profit German cultural exchange association operating worldwide in 159 locations. It promotes the study of the German language, encourages cultural exchange, and fosters knowledge about present-day Germany by providing information on culture, society, and politics, incl. films, music, theater, and literature, cultural societies, reading rooms & exam and language centers. The organization is named after the famous German poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and was founded in 1951 as the successor to the Deutsche Akademie that had existed since 1925.  

Today, the Goethe-Institut offers e-learning German language courses online as well as physical locations. It has developed a series of exams for learners of German as a foreign language (Deutsch als Fremdsprache, DaF) at all levels, A1 up to C2. These can be taken both in Germany and abroad, and have been adapted to fit into the CEFL, the standard for European language testing. There also is the Großes Deutsches Sprachdiplom, which is at a higher level than the highest CEFL certificate. Click to find a Goethe Institute location in your country or within Germany.

Working link: https://www.goethe.de/en/wwt.html

willkommen-in-germany: Johannes Kepler (Dec 27, 1571 – Nov 15,…

willkommen-in-germany:

Johannes Kepler (Dec 27, 1571 – Nov 15, 1630) was a German astronomer, astrologer, and mathematician. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his Laws of Planetary Motion, based on his works Astronomia Nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. (These works also provided one of the foundations for Englishman Isaac Newton’s theory of universal gravitation.) During his career, he was a math teacher at a seminary school in Graz, where he became an associate of Prince Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg. Later he became an assistant to Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, and eventually the imperial mathematician to Emperor Rudolf II and his successors Matthias and Ferdinand II. He was also a math teacher in Linz, and an adviser to General Wallenstein. He did fundamental work in the field of optics and invented an improved version of the refracting telescope (Keplerian Telescope). He lived in an era when there was no clear distinction between Astronomy and Astrology, but there was a strong division between Astronomy (a branch of Mathematics within the Liberal Arts) and Physics (a branch of Natural Philosophy). Kepler also incorporated religious arguments and reasoning into his work, motivated by the religious conviction and belief that God had created the world according to an intelligible plan that is accessible through the natural light of reason. He described his new Astronomy as “Celestial Physics”, “an excursion into Aristotle’s Metaphysics”, and “a supplement to Aristotle’s On the Heavens”, transforming the ancient tradition of Physical Cosmology by treating astronomy as part of a universal mathematical physics. Read more here.

Am Sylvenstein-Stausee in Bayern (Bavaria), Southern Germany

Am Sylvenstein-Stausee in Bayern (Bavaria), Southern Germany

willkommen-in-germany: German Regional Food: Die Schweinshaxe…

willkommen-in-germany:

German Regional Food: Die Schweinshaxe is a Bavarian specialty food, it’s a roasted ham hock aka pork knuckle. Elsewhere in Germany, a variation is known as Eisbein, in which the meat is pickled & slightly boiled. Schweinshaxe is a typical former “Armeleuteessen” (poor people’s food), in which inexpensive cuts of meat were used and made delicious through special cooking methods. Such cuts usually require a long preparation. The meat is marinated for days, in the case of big cuts up to a week. The Schweinshaxe is then roasted at low temps for 2-3 hours. The Bavarian version is usually served with a savory brown sauce, red cabbage, and potato dumplings, or with sauerkraut and potatoes. You will feel like Fred Feuerstein eating this. ;D

More German food.

willkommen-in-germany: Berliner / Berliner Pfannkuchen /…

willkommen-in-germany:

Berliner / Berliner Pfannkuchen / Krapfen

Zutaten für 16 Stück: 600g Mehl – 2 Päckchen Trockenhefe (oder ein Würfel Frisch-Hefe) – 2 Eier – 65g Butter (flüssig, aber nicht heiß) – 2-4 TL Zucker – ½ TL Salz – 50ml Wasser (lauwarm) – 130ml Milch (lauwarm) – Puderzucker – Marmelade (für die Füllung, z.B. Himbeerkonfitüre ohne Kerne oder Nutella) – Puderzucker zum Bestäuben – ca. 1 KG Pflanzenfett zum frittieren

A Berliner or Krapfen is a traditional North German pastry similar to a doughnut (without the hole) made from sweet yeast dough fried in oil, with a marmalade filling and sugar on top. They’re sometimes made with chocolate, champagne, custard, mocha, or advocaat (egg liquor) filling. They can be purchased throughout the year, though they were traditionally eaten on New Year’s Eve (Silvester) as well as Karneval (Rosenmontag and Fat Tuesday). A common old practical joke for New Year’s parties is to secretly fill some Berliners with mustard instead of jam and serve them together with the regular ones without telling anyone. 🙂