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Siegen in Nordrhein-Westfalen, Northwestern Germany, is located in the Arnsberg region. It’s a university town with nearly 20,000 students in 2019. The name comes from the possibly Celtic river name Sieg. It is, however, unclear whether there is any relation between this name and the Celtic-Germanic Sicambri (Ger. Sugambrer) people, who in pre-Christian times lived in parts of North Rhine-Westphalia. The first documentary mention of the place called Sigena dates from 1079. The city’s history is markedly shaped by mining, which locally began as far back as La Tène times. Bearing witness to this longtime industry are the many mines that can be found within city limits.

Die Burg Hohenzollern in Hechingen, Baden-Würt…

Die Burg Hohenzollern in Hechingen, Baden-Württemberg, Southwestern Germany

Zollern, from 1218 Hohenzollern, was a county of the Holy Roman Empire. Later its capital was Hechingen. The Hohenzollern Castle lies on a 855 m high hilltop and still belongs to the family today. The dynasty was first mentioned in 1061. The Zollerns received the comital title from Emperor Henry V in 1111. Read about the history:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Hohenzollern

The Holy Roman Empire at its greatest extent in the 13th century…

The Holy Roman Empire at its greatest extent in the 13th century under the German Hohenstaufen dynasty (1155-1268).

The Staufer, aka House of Hohenstaufen, were a dynasty of German kings (1138–1254). They also ruled the Kingdom of Sicily. In Italy, they’re known as the Svevi (Swabians) as they were successive dukes of Swabia from 1079. Three members of the dynasty – Frederick I, Henry VI, and Frederick II – were crowned Holy Roman Emperors. The dynasty is named for their seat at Hohenstaufen Castle, which was in turn named for a conical hill of the Swabian Jura with the name Hohenstaufen in what is now Göppingen, Baden-Württemberg, Southwestern Germany. Read more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hohenstaufen