The Schneefernerhaus at Germany’s highest mountain, the…

The Schneefernerhaus at Germany’s highest mountain, the Zugspitze, is a former hotel, now used as an environmental research station. It lies in the Alps, just below the Zugspitze’s summit at 2,650 m and was opened 1931. It used to house the top station of the Zugspitze Railway as well as a hotel. There was a cable car from the Schneefernerhaus to the summit. In 1938 a gallery for pedestrians was opened from the ridge station of the Tyrolean Zugspitze Cable Car to the Schneefernerhaus. From 1945-1952 the hotel was commandeered for use as a “recreation facility” by US Forces. In 1965, an avalanche that swept over the sun terrace of the hotel and the lifts claimed 10 lives and injured 21. This tragedy was the impetus behind the introduction of a state avalanche warning system. In 1988, after the new railway station was opened, the SonnAlpin restaurant was extended. Hotel and restaurant operations finally ceased in 1992. The track of the Zugspitze Railway is still there but is now used only to serve the research station.

The “Hessians” were German auxiliaries in the 1700’s, contracted…

The “Hessians” were German auxiliaries in the 1700’s, contracted for military service by the British government. They took their name from the German state of Hessen-Kassel, where many of them originated. The British hired them for combat in several 18th century conflicts, but they’re mostly associated with combat operations in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783). About 30,000 Germans fought for the British during that war, making up 25% of the troops the British sent to America. They entered the British service as entire units, fighting under their own flags, commanded by their usual officers, wearing their existing uniforms. The largest contingent came from the state of Hessen, which supplied about 40% of the German troops who fought for the British. This led to the use of the term Hessians to refer to all German troops fighting on the British side, a form of synecdoche. The rest were rented from other German states. Patriots presented them as foreign mercenaries with no stake in America. Many of the men were press-ganged into Hessian service. Deserters were executed or beaten. Hessian prisoners of war were put to work on local farms.

Read more: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hessian_(soldier)

singlegermanfemale: Better late than never: German-American Day…

singlegermanfemale:

Better late than never: German-American Day (Deutsch-Amerikanischer Tag) is a holiday in the USA, observed annually on October 6. It celebrates German-American heritage and commemorates the date in 1683 when 13 German families from Krefeld in the Rheinland landed in Philadelphia. These families subsequently founded Germantown, PA, the first German settlement in the original 13 American colonies, and organized the first petition in the English colonies to abolish slavery in 1688. Originally known under the rubric of “German Day”, the holiday was celebrated for the first time in Philadelphia in 1883, on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the arrival of the settlers. Similar celebrations developed later in other parts of the country. The custom died out during World War I as a result of the anti-German sentiments. The holiday was revived in 1983, when President Reagan proclaimed October 6 as German-American Day to celebrate and honor the 300th anniversary of German-American immigration and culture to the United States.

Couldn’t help but laugh. When I first heard someone say…

Couldn’t help but laugh. When I first heard someone say it, I had no idea what that word was. Bach is another one. 😄

:D It’s election day today in Germany – GEH WÄHLEN!

😀

It’s election day today in Germany – GEH WÄHLEN!

Marktplatz in Butzbach, Hessen, Central Germany, located about…

Marktplatz in Butzbach, Hessen, Central Germany, located about 15 km from Gießen and 35 km from Frankfurt am Main. The Landgrafenschloss, used by the U.S. Army until 1990, is now utilized by the city council. The so-called “Roman Way Housing” of the U.S. Army with more than 1000 apartments was returned to the German Government in 2007 and has since been renovated and rented out to the public. The “Schrenzer” hill (or Heidelbeerberg, 385 m) overlooks the town and the country north of Frankfurt, called Wetterau. Another higher mountain nearby is the Hausberg which features a look-out tower.