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Coburg is located on the Itz river in the Upper Franconia region of Bayern (Bavaria), Southern Germany. Long part of one of the Thuringian states of the Wettin line, it joined Bavaria by popular vote only in 1920. Until 1918, it was one of the capitals of the Duchy of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and the Duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. Through successful dynastic policies, the ruling princely family married into several of the royal families of Europe, most notably in the person of Prince Albert, who married Queen Victoria in 1840. As a result of these close links with the royal houses of Europe in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Coburg was frequently visited by the crowned heads of Europe and their families.

Coburg is also known as the location of Veste Coburg, one of Germany’s largest castles. In 1530, Martin Luther lived there for six months during which he worked on translating the Bible into German.

Today, Coburg’s population is close to 41,500. Since it was little damaged in World War II, it retains many historic buildings, making it a popular tourist destination.

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https://youtu.be/0ZR9B2KIJBI

Docu on the history of Germany, in English, 56 mins.

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Der Zwinger in Dresden, Sachsen, Eastern Germany

Der Dresdner Zwinger is a palace built in Baroque style, designed by court architect Matthäus Daniel Pöppelmann. It served as orangery, exhibition gallery, and festival arena of the Dresden Court. The location was formerly part of a fortress of which the outer wall is conserved. The name derives from the German word Zwinger (an enclosed killing ground in front of a castle or city gate); it was for the cannons that were placed between the outer wall and the main wall. The Zwinger was not enclosed until the Neoclassical building by Gottfried Semper called the Semper Gallery was built on its northern side.

Today, it is a museum that contains the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister (Old Masters Picture Gallery), the Dresden Porcelain Collection (Dresdener Porzellansammlung) and the Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon (Royal Cabinet of Mathematical and Physical Instruments).

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Neuschwanstein is Germany’s most famous castle, it’s a must visit castle in Germany but it’s just not our number #1 castle in Germany. Walt Disney modeled Cinderella’s castle after Neuschwanstein. You’ll see the castle miles before you get there, it’s perched up on a hill above Hohenschwangau village. It gets very busy, over 1.4 million people visit annually and up to 6,000 per day in the summer months when tickets often sell out before noon. The famous picture of Neuschwanstein Castle was taken standing on Mary’s Bridge (Marienbrücke), the bridge is often closed in the winter months due to weather and has been under maintenance recently.

To purchase tickets in advance and to see if Mary’s Bridge is open click here, note there is a service fee but trust us it’s better than waiting in line.

Castle Hours: October 16th – March 23rd 9 am -3 pm, March 24th – October 15th 8 am – 5 pm

Castle Fee: Adults €13 and children under 18 free

Address: Neuschwansteinstraße 20, 87645 Schwangau, Germany

If you are driving the Romantic Road in Germany Neuschwanstein is one of the many highlights along the way. We suggest ending your drive here as the castle is the most impressive of all the castles along the Romantic Road.

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If you visit Neuschwanstein then Hohenschwangau should be your next or prior castle stop as they are located on the same grounds and you can buy a combined ticket for both. It’s not nearly as popular as Neuschwanstein but it should be noted that it’s where the idea of building Neuschwanstein came about.

Castle Hours: October 16th – March 23rd 9 am -3 pm, March 24th – October 15th 8 am – 5 pm

Castle Fee: Adults €13 and children under 18 free

Address: Alpseestraße 30, 87645 Schwangau, Germany

Oldenburg in Niedersachsen (Lower Saxony), Nor…

Oldenburg in Niedersachsen (Lower Saxony), Northern Germany, is situated between Bremen (Germany) and Groningen (Netherlands); it’s part of the Bremen/Oldenburg Metropolitan Region of 2.37 million people. It’s also the place of origin of the House of Oldenburg. Before the end of the German Empire (1918), it was the administrative center and residence of the monarchs of Oldenburg. Archaeological finds point to a settlement dating back as far the 8th century.

Das Schloss Hohenschwangau is a 19th-century p…

Das Schloss Hohenschwangau is a 19th-century palace. It was the childhood residence of King Ludwig II of Bavaria and was built by his father, Maximilian II. It is located in Hohenschwangau near Füssen, which is part of the county of Ostallgäu in Bayern (Bavaria): Southern Germany, near the border with Austria.

Keep reading:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hohenschwangau_Castle