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Deutsche Bank AG is a German multinational investment bank and financial services company headquartered in Frankfurt amMain in Hessen, Central Germany. It is operational in 58 countries with a large presence in Europe, the Americas, and Asia. As of April 2018, Deutsche Bank is the 15th-largest bank in the world by total assets. As the largest German banking institution in the world, it is a component of the DAX stock market index.

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https://youtu.be/Ka4OlfQGTa8

BIRKENSTOCK Sandals — yay or nay?

50 minute docu on the not very pretty but functional and good-for-feet orthopedic Birkenstock sandals, which came out of West Germany in the 1960‘s.

The brand traces its roots to Johann Adam Birkenstock, registered in 1774 as a “vassal and shoemaker” in the small Hessian village of Langen-Bergheim. In 1896, Johann’s great-great-grandson Konrad Birkenstock developed the first contoured insole for use by shoemakers in the production of custom footwear. Also in the year 1896 Karl opened two shoe stores in Frankfurt, where he continued to make and sell his insoles. 1902 saw the development of the first flexible arch-support for insertion into factory-made shoes; and in 1964, Karl Birkenstock developed these inserts into a shoe — thus producing the original prototype of the Birkenstock sandal. In 1925 Konrad Birkenstock expanded the company by buying a large factory in Friedberg, Hessen. After World War II (1939–1945) the Birkenstock sandal was popular among returning soldiers because of the orthopedic support. Starting in 1963 and continuing into 1964 Karl Birkenstock released his first athletic sandal with a flexible footbed called Madrid. It soon became popular, especially among gymnasts.

The footbed of the Birkenstock shoe was created in the 1930s and possesses four different layers that complete the shoes. The first layer of the shoe is the shock absorbent sole, followed by two layers of jute fibers, and a firm corked footbed. The last layer is the footbed line which is a soft suede.

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HUNGARIANS IN GERMANY

There are approx. 120,000 Hungarians living in Germany. They have emigrated since the Middle Ages, but since WW1, numbers have increased at a higher pace. Today, around 75% of them live in Bayern (Bavaria), Baden-Württemberg, and Hessen. Only about 60% arrived with a Hungarian passport; many came from areas of the former Kingdom of Hungary (look up the Treaty of Trianon from 1920).

About 30,000 Hungarians arrived after 1945

About 25,000 arrived after the Hungarian Revolution of 1956

25,000 came as Gastarbeiter (guest workers) from Yugoslavia after 1960

Around 5,000 migranted from Czechoslovakia after the Prague Spring of 1968

Approx. 30,000 Hungarians came from Transylvania / Romania after 1975

About 15,000 arrived fleeing communism in general in Hungary

15,000 moved to East Germany (until the 1990 German reunification)

Notable people of Hungarian descent:

— Albrecht Dürer, painter (his father moved to Germany from Hungary, his surname refers to their old Hungarian village)

— Béla Ernyey, actor

— Joschka Fischer, politician, foreign minister, his family was expelled from Hungary in 1946

— Imre Kertész, writer, recipient of the 2002 Nobel Prize in Literature

— Kevin Kurányi, football player (Hungarian on father)

— Philipp Lenard, physicist, winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1905

— Franz Liszt, classical composer

— Leslie Mándoki, musician

— Dzsenifer Marozsán, football player, captain of the Germany women’s national team, Willi Orban – football player, Niklas Süle – football player

— George Tabori, writer

For the reversed situation of Germans in Hungary, also see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germans_of_Hungary