Doktorspiele (2014) 1 hour 35 min, teen comed…

Doktorspiele (2014)

1 hour 35 min, teen comedy, auf Deutsch, filmed in Frankfurt am Main in Hessen, Central Germany.

„This teenage rom-com, erm, “coming of age movie” (sounds better) is squarely aimed at a teenage market. Drop-dead gorgeous young actors are pretending to be experiencing the same romantic woes of spotty little butterballs like you and me. The boys’ chests are shredded and waxed, the chicks are waifish and perfectly groomed. It may not be how I remember my highschool daze, but it’s certainly a lot nicer to look at. The story is simplistic (boy is after chick a, then realizes that he’s always been in love with chick b) but it’s well acted and has tolerable dialogues. I especially liked how the music fuses in perfectly, and how the movie manages to weave in a few modern elements along the way, e. g. one of the characters has to negotiate the sex he sees in internet porn with making love to a real girl.“ (IMDB review by Karl Self)

Till Eulenspiegel is the protagonist of a Germ…

Till Eulenspiegel is the protagonist of a German chapbook from 1515 (a first edition of circa 1510/12 is preserved fragmentarily) with a possible background in earlier Middle Low German folklore.

Eulenspiegel is a native of Braunschweig (Brunswick) whose picaresque career takes him to many places throughout the Holy Roman Empire. He plays practical jokes on his contemporaries, especially scatological in nature, exposing vices at every turn. His life is set in the first half of the 14th century, and the final chapters of the chapbook describe his death from the plague of 1350. His name translates to “owl mirror”, and the frontispiece of the 1515 chapbook, as well as his alleged tombstone in Mölln, Schleswig-Holstein, display the name in rebus writing, by an owl and a hand mirror. Retellings of the Eulenspiegel tradition have been published in modern literature, since the later 19th century. Notably, The Legend of Thyl Ulenspiegel and Lamme Goedzak by Charles De Coster (1867) transfers the character to the context of the Protestant Reformation and the Dutch Revolt. The Ulenspiegel (modern Dutch: Tijl Uilenspiegel) from this novel became a symbol of Flemish independence. Read more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Till_Eulenspiegel