Hannover‘s Hinterhöfe — Eine überraschende Wel…

Hannover‘s Hinterhöfe — Eine überraschende Welt

Die Nordstory, NDR docu on the urban courtyards of Hannover-Linden, an inner city neighborhood in Niedersachsen (Lower Saxony), Northern Germany. 58 mins, auf Deutsch.

Homes in Bissendorf in der Wedemark, Niedersac…

Homes in Bissendorf in der Wedemark, Niedersachsen (Lower Saxony), in Northern Germany. „Wedemark“ is a historical landscape description for the area and is situated about 20 km north of Hannover. It ranks #3 on average per capita income in Lower Saxony. Wedemark’s neighbors are the municipalities Burgwedel, Isernhagen, Langenhagen, Garbsen, Neustadt am Rübenberge, Lindwedel, and Wietze.

Till Eulenspiegel is the protagonist of a Germ…

Till Eulenspiegel is the protagonist of a German chapbook from 1515 (a first edition of circa 1510/12 is preserved fragmentarily) with a possible background in earlier Middle Low German folklore.

Eulenspiegel is a native of Braunschweig (Brunswick) whose picaresque career takes him to many places throughout the Holy Roman Empire. He plays practical jokes on his contemporaries, especially scatological in nature, exposing vices at every turn. His life is set in the first half of the 14th century, and the final chapters of the chapbook describe his death from the plague of 1350. His name translates to “owl mirror”, and the frontispiece of the 1515 chapbook, as well as his alleged tombstone in Mölln, Schleswig-Holstein, display the name in rebus writing, by an owl and a hand mirror. Retellings of the Eulenspiegel tradition have been published in modern literature, since the later 19th century. Notably, The Legend of Thyl Ulenspiegel and Lamme Goedzak by Charles De Coster (1867) transfers the character to the context of the Protestant Reformation and the Dutch Revolt. The Ulenspiegel (modern Dutch: Tijl Uilenspiegel) from this novel became a symbol of Flemish independence. Read more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Till_Eulenspiegel

Aurich in Niedersachsen (Lower Saxony), Northe…

Aurich in Niedersachsen (Lower Saxony), Northern Germany. Its beginnings as a town date back to the 13th century, when „Aurechove“ was first mentioned in a document. In 1517, it was rebuilt after an attack and the town center was established — it is still in place today. In 1539, Aurich was made the county capital. Ostfriesland (East Frisia) was inherited by the Kingdom of Prussia in 1744. After the Prussian Army was defeated, Aurich became part of the Kingdom of Holland in 1808. In 1810, the Kingdom of Holland was annexed by France and Aurich was made the capital of the department Ems-Oriental of the French Empire. After Napoleon was defeated in 1814, it passed to the Kingdom of Hannover in 1815, then was annexed by Prussia in 1866 and made part of the Province of Hannover. After WW2, it became part of the new state of Lower Saxony and this is what it has been since.